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Jamis Xenith Race - 56cm Carbon Road Bike w/New Ultegra Groupset - $1,500 (Madeira)

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Longfield Dr near Camargo

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bicycle type: road
frame size: 56cm
wheel size: 700C
bicycle frame material: carbon fiber
suspension: none (rigid)
handlebar type: drop
electric assist: none
condition: excellent
make / manufacturer: Jamis
model name / number: Xenith Race
This is a fast bike. I’m 6’, 150# and am able to consistently hold 20-22 mph at only 2.6-2.8 w/kg and in small group rides I can pull 24mph at the front at 2.8-3.0. This is a reasonably light bike–loaded up with bottles, pump, saddle bag it’s 20.4 pounds. It lacks the marginal gains of today’s cutting edge flagship models honed in wind tunnels with wafer thin (and fragile) tubes, but you would be hard pressed to find anything matching this combination of price and performance on both flat roads and climbs.

The bike is a 2012 model year with the original frame and fork in a beautiful metallic goldenrod and raw carbon finish. Meticulously and professionally maintained and upgraded over the years to the extent that other than the obvious frame that only supports rim brakes and a preference to stick with mechanical shifting rather than retrofitting electronic, you would be hard pressed to differentiate between this and any other 2-3 year old Ultegra-level build of any of the flagship brands.

The paint overall is excellent condition, a few basic tiny chips in the obvious areas of fork and stays, though there is one larger spot of about 2” diameter behind the chainring/above the bottom bracket where a dropped chain scraped the paint, did not damage the frame, and it’s been touched up by hand but the color and finish are evident. Given its location, it is not visible unless you remove the crank or are doing cleaning/detailing. It now has a low profile chain catcher and this has never been an issue since.

The original handlebar was replaced approximately 8 years ago through a professional bike fit, now has a very nice (round) Richey bar. Stem replaced last year with Zipp Service Course SL stem (130mm, 17 degree), slightly lighter than the originals, though resulting in a slightly lower and more aggressive riding position. Note that we did not cut the bar, so there is still plenty of room/spacers to go back to a higher position if you prefer, and I will provide a 110mm stem if you want shorter reach.

Bottom bracket–no finicky squeaky press fit BB30 here. I upgraded to Wheels Mfg angular contact ceramic bearings and that still had plenty of life left when I upgraded to BB infinite with Ceramitech bearings, backed by their lifetime warranty. This was installed in 2023 and has 3k miles on it.

Headset/bearings–The original were just about at end of its life so I replaced with Cane Creek (now/brand new).

Wheels/Tires–Currently using Hunt Aero Sprint alloy rims, 31mm depth, 24mm wide, 19mm internal width, 4 years old. Hunt lists their weight at 1497 grams for the pair. The front rim has one minor ding but rolls fine, brakes fine, wheels are perfectly true. I’ve been tubeless on them the entire time. Tires are Schwalbe One 700x25 (tubeless) installed 800 miles/6 months ago.

Pedals-not included, though if test riding I have Speedplay and Look/Keo available and a “hybrid” that’s flat/no clip on one side, Shimano SPD on the other.

Saddle--the 3D printed model on the bike is NOT included, will include your choice of either the basic saddle that came with it or a slightly racier San Marco model with a cutout.

Brakes-Ultegra front and rear

Drive train–the original Ultegra 10-speed drive train lasted until last summer when one of the shifter’s internal bits broke. I replaced the entire 10-speed system with Ultegra 8700 11-speed mechanical throughout–front and rear derailleur, cranks and chainrings, cassette, all cabling. 50/34 up front, 11-34 on the back. The 1:1 ratio on lowest end is unusual for 11-speed and makes a big difference on steep climbs. I will also provide a used 52T chainring if you’d prefer larger.

A note on the drivetrain, chain, and general attentiveness and care this bike has had–the current chain is a KMC with a reusable quick-link and is fully immersion-waxed, does not need or use oil-based lubricants. I have been immersion waxing for 8+ years. I will also supply a brand new Ultegra chain, fully stripped of factory grease, ultrasonic cleaned, and immersion-waxed. You obviously do not need to continue waxing if that’s not your thing, but the usual hassle and complexity that tends to scare away all but the geekiest obsessive/compulsives like me is no longer an issue–there are remarkably easy and environmentally friendly products out there that reduce the first/original wax process to 15 minutes of effort and rewaxing (every 500-750 miles) even less effort. Riding waxed chains for this long I can vouch for the benefits. Everything stays clean (and no more oil streaks on legs, socks, etc.), whisper quiet when pedaling, more efficient (studies show approx 6-10 watts saved versus oil), but the killer benefit is extending the life of the entire drivetrain, not just the chain. I use an expensive precision chain checker and never let a chain stay on the bike once it’s reached the limit (0.50-0.60), and I’m typically getting 8000-10000 MILES out of every chain, and if it weren;t for the shifter issue that led to me upgrade to 11-speed, I’d still be riding the 10-speed cassette that at the time had more than 40,000 miles and teeth were still practically new. The independent rating site zero friction cycling offers plenty of data and comparison of all the major lubricant and wax products and does a great job translating that to cost per mile based on how expensive a drive train you’re riding. If you wish to wax and are using local pickup, I will also provide the crockpot that includes a block of Silca’s wax that should support at least 5-10 rewaxings.

post id: 7739883798

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